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Cooking Seasonally :: Embracing Winter’s Bounty

Entertaining Recipes
winter healthy recipe

While colder weather often causes us to crave warm foods (and carbs!), eating produce during the winter months does not have to be boring. Incorporating seasonal options and focusing on increasing your intake of root vegetables during the cold winter months will ensure that your plate or bowl is always full of good-for-you vitamins and nutrients.

SEASONAL PRODUCE

Produce harvest in Maryland does slow during the colder winter months of December, January and February but that doesn’t mean that you have to give up your vegetables. Focus instead of those items that are harvested later in the season. Vegetables like broccoli, Brussel sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, chard, collards, kale, mushrooms, onions, radishes, spinach, winter squash, sweet potatoes, and turnips are all good options for making soups, stews and other dishes during the winter season.

Try:

  • Roasted or Grilled Cauliflower Steak
  • Braised Greens with freshly ground black pepper and citrus juice/zest
  • Sautéed cabbage with onions, carrots and fresh herbs

ROOT VEGETABLES

Root vegetables are simply edible plant roots. They include vegetables like beets, carrots, jicama, parsnips rutabaga and sweet potatoes. Low in calories, full of fiber and rich in key vitamins and minerals, root vegetables are definitely worth including at your next meal. Preparation methods for root vegetables are endless: raw, roasted, steamed or boiled; there are many ways you can incorporate them into meals.

Try:

  • Raw: Jicama sliced into sticks with a sprinkle of cayenne pepper and squeeze of fresh lime juice
  • Roasted: Carrots and parsnips with a sprinkle of grapeseed oil, Italian seasoning and a dash of black pepper.
  • Steamed, Rutabagas and carrots steamed and then mashed.

Enjoy produce during the winter by incorporating new choices and preparation methods. Focus on including vegetables with a variety of colors to vary the nutrient profile on your plate. When possible, aim to include seasonal choices to support your local farmers by choosing foods typically harvested toward the end of the season. It won’t be long before spring arrives but in the meantime cherish the bounty that the winter has to offer.

Winter Vegetable Nutrition Facts
Calories Fat Carbohydrates Fiber Protein
Beets

(1/2 cup cooked)

37 0 8 2 1
Broccoli

(1/2 cup, raw)

15 0 3 1 1
Brussel Sprouts

(1/2 cup, cooked)

28 0 5 2 2
Cabbage

(1/2 cup, cooked)

17 0 4 1 1
Cauliflower

(1/2 cup, cooked)

14 0 3 1 1
Carrots

(1/2 cup, cooked)

27 0 6 2 0
Chard

(1/2 cup, cooked)

18 0 4 2 2
Kale

(1/2 cup, cooked)

18 0 4 1 1
Parsnip

(1/2 cup, cooked)

55 0 13 3 1
Spinach

(1/2 cup, cooked)

21 0 3 2 3
Rutabagas

(1/2 cup, cooked)

36 0 8 2 1
Turnips

(1/2 cup, cooked)

29 0 4 2.5 2
Yams

(1/2 cup, cooked)

79 0 19 3 1

Source: USDA Nutrient Database

 

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